1.  
         
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        "Intérieur de maison Kabyle", c1900
      2. #121
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Femmes au travail, Algérie, c1930
      3. #122
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Fabrication de tapis, Algérie, c1900
      4. #123
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Récolte du blé, Alger, c1890
      5. #124
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Trois enfants d'Algérie, c1880
      6. #125
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Enfants dans une rue dans la haute ville à Alger, c1890
      7. #126
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Une femme dans un décor oriental
        Alger, c1880
    1. sers
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Boutique d'un mozabite à Alger, c1880
    2. #114
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Femmes tissant le burnous, Sahara algérien, c1880
    3. #115
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Deux femmes à Alger, c1870
    4. #116
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Deux femmes à Alger, c1880

    5. #117
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Enfants algériens, c1880
    6. #118
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Femme de Bou Saâda, c1880
    7. #119
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Famille kabyle, Algérie, c1890
      1.  
      2. sers
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Boutique d'un mozabite à Alger, c1880
      3. #114
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Femmes tissant le burnous, Sahara algérien, c1880
      4. #115
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Deux femmes à Alger, c1870
      5. #116
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Deux femmes à Alger, c1880

      6. #117
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Enfants algériens, c1880
      7. #118
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Femme de Bou Saâda, c1880
      8. #119
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Famille kabyle, Algérie, c1890
       
      1. Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Femme portant son enfant dans le dos, Biskra, c1880
      2. #128
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Jeune femme juive de Laghouat, c1880



      3. #129
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Femme kabyle, c1880
      4. #130
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Femme kabyle, c1880
      5. #131
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Une femme kabyle, c1880



      6. #132
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Jeune fille kabyle, c1880
      7. #133
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0
         


        Deux jeunes femmes kabyles c1875



        1.  


        2. Femmes de Bou Saâda, début du 20ème siècle



        3. #143
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Femme à Alger, c1880
        4. #144
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Une jeune fille à Alger, c1875
        5. #145
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Jeune femme à Alger, c1880s

        6. #146
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Femme à Alger, c1880
        7. #147
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Une jeune fille d'Algérie, c1880
           
          1.  


          2. Femme d'Algérie, c1870
          3. #149
            Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
            Join Date
            Jan 2006
            Posts
            0


            Portrait d'une jeune femme, Algérie, c1880



          4. #150
            Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
            Join Date
            Jan 2006
            Posts
            0


            Une jeune femme d'Algérie, c1880
          5. #151
            Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
            Join Date
            Jan 2006
            Posts
            0


            Une jeune fille d'Algérie, c1880
          6. #152
            Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
            Join Date
            Jan 2006
            Posts
            0


            Une jeune fille d'Algérie, c1880

          7. #153
            Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
            Join Date
            Jan 2006
            Posts
            0


            Palais à Constantine, c1920
          8. #154
            Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
            Join Date
            Jan 2006
            Posts
            0


            Ancienne maison du dey à Alger, c1860
             
    Partager via Gmail Pin It

    votre commentaire
    1.  


    2. Market at Biskra, 1899
    3. #44
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Women making carpets in Algiers, 1899
    4. #45
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Algiers café scene, 1899
    5. #46
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Playing chess in Algiers, 1899
    6. #47
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Algiers, family group, 1899
    7. #48
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Luce Ben Aben, School of Arab embroidery, Algiers, 1899


    Sidi Okba Street, Algiers, 1922

    1.  
    2. Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Dancers in Algiers, 1899
    3. #51
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Luce Ben Aben, Women preparing couscous, Algiers, 1899
    4. #52
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0
       


      A coffee house in Algiers, 1899
      1.  
      2. Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Algerian soldiers ('Spahis') cooking their meal in a village in Oise, France, 1917
        (Autochrome color picture by Jean-Baptiste Tournassoud)
      3. #86
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Algerian soldiers in the village of Noyon, Northern France, during the First World War
      4. #87
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Algerians, serving in the French army during the First World War

        American picture, made by photographers of the Underwood & Underwood Agency. 
        The caption reads that these soldiers are nicknamed Terrible Turcos.
        The term Turcos was used not just for people from Turkey, but also for North-Africans.
        On the reverse of this card there is another text: 
        "These soldiers are impetuous fighters, and the difficulty the French generals find in their employment 
        is to hold them back at times when to charge the enemy is foolhardy."
      5. #88
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0
      6. #89
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        Portrait of an Algerian Fusilier, 1916
        (Autochrome color picture by Jean-Baptiste Tournassoud)
      7. #90
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0


        An Algerian soldier on sentry duty, 1917
      8. #91
        Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
        Join Date
        Jan 2006
        Posts
        0




        Algerian soldiers of the First World War
        1.  
        2. Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Algerian cavalry bringing in German prisoners during the First World War
        3. #93
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Algerian cavalry on parade during the First World War
        4. #94
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          First World War poster:
          "An Algerian soldier pays his farewells to his wife and daughter"
        5. #95
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          "Charge of the Algerian Dragoons on the Belgian front, 1915"
        6. #96
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Algerian Shops, a painting from 1895, by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933)



          Reproduction of Algerian Shops, a painting by Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933)
        7. #97
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          Algerian girl selling pomegranates

          by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825-1905) 

          Currently held by the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, UK
        8. #98
          Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
          Join Date
          Jan 2006
          Posts
          0


          A Street in Algeria, by Frederick Arthur Bridgman (1847-1928)
       
    Partager via Gmail Pin It

    votre commentaire
    1.  


    2. Femme dans les rues de la vieille ville, Alger, c1880
    3. #136
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Dans les rues d'Alger, c1880
    4. #137
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Jeune femme voilée à Alger 
      Algérie, c1880


    5. #138
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Jeune femme algérienne, c1880

    6. #139
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Groupe d'enfants dans une rue, Algérie, c1910
    7. #140
      Guest 123 is offlineQuarantined Users
      Join Date
      Jan 2006
      Posts
      0


      Une jeune femme d'Algérie, c1875

    Partager via Gmail Pin It

    votre commentaire
  • <header style="font-size: medium; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; line-height: 16px; vertical-align: baseline;">

    13 photographies qui marqueront à jamais notre Histoire

    </header>

    .
    Corentin Vilsalmon, le <time datetime="2013-10-17" pubdate="" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant: inherit; font-weight: inherit; line-height: inherit; vertical-align: baseline;">17 octobre 2013</time>

    Parmi toutes les photographies prises à travers le monde pour illustrer des moments historiques, il en existe quelques unes qui resteront à jamais gravées dans les mémoires. C’est le cas de ces 13 clichés pris entre la fin du 20ème siècle et le début du 21ème qui illustrent des faits poignants de l’époque contemporaine.

    1. Portrait de Che Gevara lors de l’enterrement des victimes de l’explosion de la Coubre

    13-photographies-qui-marqueront-a-jamais-lhistoire1

    Le Che, comme il était surnommé à cause d’un tic de langage, a été pris en portrait lors de l’enterrement des victimes de l’explosion de la Coubre, le 5 mars 1960. Il était alors âgé de 31 ans mais représentait déjà l’espoir de beaucoup de personnes et un symbole de rébellion. Cette photographie, prise par Alterto Korda, est l’une des plus connues du monde moderne et l’Institute of Art du Maryland l’a surnommée « photographie la plus célèbre et l’icône graphique du monde du XXème siècle. » Elle est également considérée comme un symbole de rébellion et comme étant l’un des portraits les plus célèbres de tous les temps.

     

    2. L’abominable agonie d’Omayra

    13-photographies-qui-marqueront-a-jamais-lhistoire2

    Lors de l’éruption du volcan colombien le Nevado del Ruiz en 1985, la ville d’Armero a été complètement détruite. Omayra Sánchez est restée coincée pendant trois jours dans les gravas de sa propre maison, dans la boue et l’eau insalubre. Les sauveteurs n’ont pu la sauver car l’opération d’amputation n’était pas possible, tandis que l’autre option, celle de pomper la boue autour d’elle, n’a pas eu lieu non plus à cause du manque d’équipement des secours. Cette photographie, publiée plusieurs mois après la mort de la jeune fille, a été prise par Frank Fournieret a cristallisé de nombreuses plaintes à propos du gouvernement colombien, accusé d’indifférence envers les victimes de cette catastrophe. Selon les témoignages des gens qui l’entouraient pendant son agonie, Omayra est restée digne et forte jusqu’à ses derniers instants.

     

    3. Des touristes regardent le cadavre d’un immigrant

    13-photographies-qui-ont-marque-a-jamais-lhistoire-moderne3

    Prise par Javier Bauluz, seul photographe espagnol à avoir reçu le fameux prix Pulitzer, cette photographie montre deux touristes sur une plage espagnole qui regardent le corps d’un immigrant mort échoué sur le sable. Objet d’une polémique, ce cliché dénonce l’hypocrisie des autorités et de certains Espagnols en ce qui concerne l’immigration illégale de personnes voulant se rendre en Europe et en Espagne.

     

    4. Kim, la jeune vietnamienne fuyant le napalm

    13-photographies-qui-ont-marque-a-jamais-lhistoire-moderne4

    L’une des plus célèbres photographies de guerre au monde, celle de Kim Phuc, une jeune vietnamienne fuyant les lieux d’un bombardement au napalm par l’armée américaine lors de la guerre du Vietnam. Cette photographie a été prise par Nick Ut le 8 juin 1972 et montre toute la douleur et la détresse des habitants d’un village, brûlés et fuyant le désastre. La photographie a été prise au moment où les vêtements de Kim Phuc se sont consumés sous l’effet du napalm. La jeune fille a été hospitalisée pendant 14 mois, souffrant de graves brûlures et a dû subir un total de 17 greffes de peau. Aujourd’hui, Pham Thi Kim Phuc est mariée et mère de deux enfants. Elle préside la Fondation Kim Phuc et est ambassadrice à l’UNESCO.

     

    5. L’exécution d’un rebelle Vietcong à Saïgon

    13-photographies-qui-ont-marque-a-jamais-lhistoire-moderne5

    Saïgon est l’ancien nom de la ville vietnamienne Hô-Chi-Minh-Ville. Cette photographie a été prise par Eddie Adams, lauréat du prix Pulitzer, le 1er février 1968. Elle montre l’assassinat d’un rebelle Vietcong par le chef de la police de la ville. Le prisonnier a les mains attachées alors que le « colonel » est sur le point d’appuyer sur la détente. Eddy Adams dira ensuite : « Le colonel a tué le prisonnier, j’ai tué le colonel avec mon appareil photo. »

     

    6. L’afghane aux yeux verts

    13-photographies-qui-marqueront-a-jamais-lhistoire6

    Cette photographie est signée Steve McCurry et date de juin 1984. Sharbat Gulaavait alors 12 ans et stationnait dans un camp de réfugiés afghans au Pakistan, lors de l’invasion de l’Union soviétique. Le cliché a été utilisé comme couverture du magazine National Geographic et est rapidement devenu l’une de ses couvertures les plus emblématiques. Le nom de la jeune fille est resté inconnu pendant longtemps, jusqu’à ce qu’après 17 ans de recherches Steve McCurry retrouve sa trace dans la région. Elle est revenue en Afghanistan en 1992 et ne savait pas qu’elle était devenue une telle icône. Son identité a été confirmée à 99,9% par les experts du FBI.

     

    7. Le baiser de Times Square

    13-photographies-qui-marqueront-a-jamais-lhistoire7

    « Dites adieu à la guerre » est une photo prise par Victor Jorgensen à la fin de la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le 14 août 1945, à Times Square. Elle représente un soldat américain embrassant une infirmière qui ne s’étaient jamais vus auparavant et qui montre la spontanéité et la joie de la population après la fin de cette guerre. Nos lecteurs nous ont fait part d’un article qui explique que cette photographie devenue célèbre représenterait en réalité une agression sexuelle.

     

    8. Le rebelle inconnu de Tian’anmen

    13-photographies-qui-marqueront-a-jamais-lhistoire8

    C’est le surnom donné à cet homme qui se tient debout face à une file de chars chinois, lors de l’insurrection de la place Tian’anmen en 1989. Pris par Jeff Widener, ce cliché a ensuite été utilisé par le gouvernement chinois pour symboliser la compassion des soldats envers les habitants dans leur mission de protection des civils. En effet, malgré l’ordre d’avancer donné par ses supérieurs, le conducteur du premier char a refusé d’obéir.

     

    9. L’homme qui tombe

    13-photographies-qui-ont-marque-a-jamais-lhistoire-moderne9

    « L’homme qui tombe » est une photo prise lors des attentats du 11 septembre 2001. Signée Richard Drew, elle montre un homme sautant du haut d’une des deux tours jumelles du World Trade Center. Cet homme a certainement fait ce choix pour éviter l’asphyxie des fumées toxiques ou parce qu’il n’y avait peut-être pas d’autres issues possibles.

     

    10. Le prêtre Luis Maria Padilla aidant un soldat blessé au Venezuela

    13-photographies-qui-ont-marque-a-jamais-lhistoire-moderne10

    L’aumônier Luis Maria Padilla tient dans ses bras un soldat blessé au cours de l’insurrection de Puerto Cabello au Venezuela, en 1962 où le gouvernement a réprimé dans le sang cette rébellion. Dans les bras du prêtre, le soldat arrivait à peine à prononcer les mots « Aidez-moi mon père » et a finalement été touché par une deuxième balle, toujours dans les bras de Luis Maria Padilla.

     

    11. Protestation contre des policiers venus évacuer des paysans de leurs champs

    13-photographies-qui-ont-marque-a-jamais-lhistoire-moderne11

    Cette femme fait partie du mouvement des sans-terre, au Brésil. Dans ce cliché pris en 2009 par Luiz Vasconcelos, elle s’oppose aux forces de l’ordre venues évacuer les habitants de terres réquisitionnées par l’état brésilien et investies par 200 paysans en guise de protestation.

     

    12. L’immolation du moine vietnamien Thich Quang Duc

    13-photographies-qui-marqueront-a-jamais-notre-histoire-12

    Célèbre photographie, prise par Malcom Browne, d’un moine vietnamien (un bonze) s’immolant par le feu dans les rues de Saïgon, le 11 juin 1963 en guise de protestation contre les répressions anti-bouddhistes perpétrées par l’armée selon l’ordre du président de confession chrétienne. L’image a marqué par les témoignages des gens présents lors de la scène puisque Thich Quang Duc est resté immobile, sans crier ni parler pendant que le feu le brûlait entièrement. Incinéré, seul son cœur serait resté intact, ce qui lui a notamment valu le statut de saint et son cœur considéré comme une relique sacrée.

     

    13. Un fillette soudanaise épiée par un vautour

    13-photographies-qui-ont-marque-a-jamais-lhistoire-moderne13

    Ce cliché saisissant représente une fillette soudanaise aux portes de la mort : émaciée, épuisée et affamée, la petite fille git sur le sol tandis qu’un vautour attend patiemment sa mort pour se nourrir de son cadavre… Le photographe et lauréat du prix Pulitzer, Kevin Carter, s’est suicidé quatre mois plus tard, rongé par la culpabilité. Ce qu’il y a de miraculeux dans cette histoire est que la petite fille photographiée a finalement survécu !

     

    Ces clichés sont vraiment frappants et poignants. On est sans voix devant de pareilles photographies qui illustrent avec justesse des moments clés de notre Histoire. Quelle est la photographie historique qui vous a le plus marqué ?

    Partager via Gmail Pin It

    votre commentaire
  • Gallery GEORGE HURELL

    Partager via Gmail Pin It

    votre commentaire


    Suivre le flux RSS des articles de cette rubrique
    Suivre le flux RSS des commentaires de cette rubrique